SHORT

NEWS

Russia’s record-breaking $15 billion World Cup price tag: What does it buy?
The FIFA World Cup in Russia is the most expensive ever, with an official price tag of $15 billion. Close
FYR Macedonia Parliament to discuss the ratification of the agreement with Greece
The bill on the ratification of the agreement with Greece, signed in the village of Psarades in Prespes on Sunday,

HOT

NEWS

Russia’s record-breaking $15 billion World Cup price tag: What does it buy?
The FIFA World Cup in Russia is the most expensive ever, with an official price tag of $15 billion. Close
FYR Macedonia Parliament to discuss the ratification of the agreement with Greece
The bill on the ratification of the agreement with Greece, signed in the village of Psarades in Prespes on Sunday,
The bill on the ratification of the agreement with Greece, signed in the village of Psarades in Prespes on Sunday, will be presented to the Parliament of FYROM on Tuesday. Political analysts and the media in FYROM estimate that the bill will be ratified, given that a simple majority is required. After the agreement is approved, the bill must be sent to President Ivanov for signing. In case Ivanov exercises his veto, as he has
/ Jun 19
Turkey goes to the polls Sunday, and President Recep Tayyip Erdogan is facing his toughest test in his 16 years in power. Challenger Muharrem Ince’s platform of breaking down Turkey’s deep political divides, especially between the religious and secular, have seen him reaching out beyond his pro-secular CHP party’s base. An increasingly confident Ince has even begun courting voters in Erdogan’s backyard. On Saturday, Ince took his campaign to Istanbul’s Uskudar district. Historically religiously conservative,
/ Jun 19
The FIFA World Cup in Russia is the most expensive ever, with an official price tag of $15 billion. Close to $3 billion has been spent on 12 new or upgraded stadiums, and at least another $8 billion on infrastructure, including new roads, railroads and airports. Is that a good return for the Russian taxpayer? Professor Leonid Grigoryev, an economist at the Analytical Center for the Government of the Russian Federation, offers an unusual analogy.
/ Jun 19
Greece’s left-led coalition government survived a no-confidence vote in parliament Saturday, brought over a deal to end a decades-old dispute with neighboring FYR Macedonia concerning the latter’s name. But the government suffered a loss in its parliamentary majority when lawmaker Dimitris Kammenos of the nationalist Independent Greeks, the government’s junior coalition partner, voted in favor. He was kicked out of the party immediately after the vote, leaving the governing coalition with a three-member majority. Lawmakers
/ Jun 17

FLASH

NEWS

Russia’s record-breaking $15 billion World Cup price tag: What does it buy?
Phantis

The FIFA World Cup in Russia is the most expensive ever, with an official price tag of $15 billion. Close to $3 billion has been spent on 12 new or upgraded stadiums, and at least another $8 billion on infrastructure, including new roads, railroads and airports.

Is…

FYR Macedonia Parliament to discuss the ratification of the agreement with Greece
Phantis

The bill on the ratification of the agreement with Greece, signed in the village of Psarades in Prespes on Sunday, will be presented to the Parliament of FYROM on Tuesday. Political analysts and the media in FYROM estimate that the bill will be ratified, given that a simple majority…

Deal ending Macedonia name dispute

The foreign ministers of Greece and FYR Macedonia signed an accord Sunday to rename the former Yugoslav republic the “Republic of North Macedonia.” The landmark accord follows decades of inconclusive talks that soured relations between
Phantis
0 3 mins
Phantis

The FIFA World Cup in Russia is the most expensive ever, with an official price tag of $15 billion. Close to $3 billion has been spent on 12 new or upgraded stadiums, and at least another $8 billion on infrastructure, including new roads, railroads and airports.

Is that a good return for the Russian taxpayer?

Professor Leonid Grigoryev, an economist at the Analytical Center for the Government of the Russian Federation, offers an unusual analogy.

“The discussion of the efficiency of the championship in Russia, like in Brazil, is the discussion of the economic efficiency of a wedding dress. On one hand, it’s necessary. It makes everybody happy,” Grigoryev told VOA in an interview. “The exact economic efficiency definitely cannot be defined in American quarterly financial reports. It’s a long-term story. We still hope to become not only a hockey country, but a football country.”

Brazil hosted the last World Cup at an estimated cost of $11 billion. Four years later, some of their traveling fans feel short-changed.

“Comparing Brazil with Russia, the infrastructure here is much better than ours,” Marcio Pessoa told VOA, as he enjoyed the festival atmosphere in Moscow’s Red Square.

Russia’s $15 billion investment is aimed at giving Russia an image makeover in the eyes of the world, even as it faces sanctions over its 2014 invasion of Ukraine and annexation of Crimea.

“ Putin, with all this strength, pretends that all that is not important for him — ‘Despite sanctions, we conduct such a gorgeous World Cup. Despite sanctions we go ahead…

MORE ARTICLES

FYR Macedonia Parliament to discuss the ratification of the agreement with Greece
The bill on the ratification of the agreement with Greece,
Challenger in Turkey vote takes campaign to Erdogan’s backyard
Turkey goes to the polls Sunday, and President Recep Tayyip
Deal ending Macedonia name dispute
The foreign ministers of Greece and FYR Macedonia signed an
Greek government survives no-confidence vote
Greece’s left-led coalition government survived a no-confidence vote in parliament
By VOA Published on Jun 19, 2018
0 6 mins
Phantis

Turkey goes to the polls Sunday, and President Recep Tayyip Erdogan is facing his toughest test in his 16 years in power.

Challenger Muharrem Ince’s platform of breaking down Turkey’s deep political divides, especially between the religious and secular, have seen him reaching out beyond his pro-secular CHP party’s base. An increasingly confident Ince has even begun courting voters in Erdogan’s backyard.

On Saturday, Ince took his campaign to Istanbul’s Uskudar district. Historically religiously conservative, Uskudar is where Erdogan chose to build his private residence overlooking the Bosphorus waterway that divides Istanbul.

Nearby, construction is the final stages on the massive $100 million Camlica mosque built by Erdogan supporters. The mosque has become a potent symbol of the president’s Islamist roots.

With Erdogan portraying himself as the protector of religious rights, Uskudar has traditionally been a stronghold for the president.

But Ince’s arrival in Uskudar was greeted by thousands of supporters, chanting “president Ince.”

“He is challenging Erdogan in front of his home,” said one enthusiastic supporter, adding “it is clearly seen here that Turkey needs Muharrem Ince. No one can stop him.”

A new page

Ince’s CHP party has always been viewed with deep suspicion by religious voters because it was created by the founder of the secular state, Mustafa Kemal Ataturk.

The CHP used to strongly back controls on religion, including the banning of Islamic headscarves in universities and courts. Restrictions ended by Erdogan in the…

MORE ARTICLES

Deal ending Macedonia name dispute
The foreign ministers of Greece and FYR Macedonia signed an
Greek government survives no-confidence vote
Greece’s left-led coalition government survived a no-confidence vote in parliament
Tear gas and minor incidents at Macedonia name rally
There were minor clashes between police and protestors outside Parliament
Poll: Ticked at Trump, Canadians say they’ll avoid US goods
Seventy percent of Canadians say they will start looking for
Greek Parliament debates Tsipras’ fate
The Greek parliament began debating a no-confidence motion in the
Defector: Trump ‘stabbed the heart’ of North Koreans at summit
Some North Korea defectors are feeling betrayed by U.S. President

[stock_ticker symbols=”AAPL,MSFT,INTC,AMD,NVDA,ATML,HPQ” show=”” zero=”” minus=”” plus=”” static=”” nolink=””]

The Hellenic Broadcasting Corporation’s (ERT) management has announced that the Greek participation in the 63rd Eurovision Song Contest will be Yianna Terzi’s song “Oneiro mou (My Dream)”, with music by the performer herself and lyrics by Yianna Terzi and Aris Kalimeris. The song is arranged and produced by Michalis Papathanassiou and Dimitris Stamatiou.   Source: ERT
/ Feb 19
The FIFA World Cup in Russia is the most expensive ever, with an official price tag of $15 billion. Close to $3 billion has been spent on 12 new or upgraded stadiums, and at least another $8 billion on infrastructure, including new roads, railroads and airports. Is that a good return for the Russian taxpayer? Professor Leonid Grigoryev, an economist at the Analytical Center for the Government of the Russian Federation, offers an unusual analogy.
/ Jun 19
The FIFA World Cup in Russia is the most expensive ever, with an official price tag of $15 billion. Close to $3 billion has been spent on 12 new or upgraded stadiums, and at least another $8 billion on infrastructure, including new roads, railroads and airports. Is that a good return for the Russian taxpayer? Professor Leonid Grigoryev, an economist at the Analytical Center for the Government of the Russian Federation, offers an unusual analogy.
/ Jun 19
The FIFA World Cup in Russia is the most expensive ever, with an official price tag of $15 billion. Close to $3 billion has been spent on 12 new or upgraded stadiums, and at least another $8 billion on infrastructure, including new roads, railroads and airports. Is that a good return for the Russian taxpayer? Professor Leonid Grigoryev, an economist at the Analytical Center for the Government of the Russian Federation, offers an unusual analogy.
/ Jun 19

WEEKLY

REPORT

Russia’s record-breaking $15 billion World Cup price tag: What does it buy?

/ Jun 19
The FIFA World Cup in Russia is the most expensive ever, with an official price tag of $15 billion. Close to $3 billion has been spent on 12 new or

THE

CATEGORY

8

340

523

June 2018
S M T W T F S
« May    
 12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930

WEATHER

TODAY

[icit_weather city=”Moscow” country=”RU” celsius=”false” breakdown=”true” display=”right” background_day=”black” background_night=”#000″ credit=”false”  mph=”true” primary_day=”#000″ ]

best

review

[soccer-info id=’1′ type=’table’ limit=’12’ icon=’icon’ /]

SPORT NEWS
VOA 19, Jun 6 mins
0 6 mins
Phantis

Turkey goes to the polls Sunday, and President Recep Tayyip Erdogan is facing his toughest test in his 16 years in power.

Challenger Muharrem Ince’s platform of breaking down Turkey’s deep political divides, especially between the religious and secular, have seen him reaching out beyond his pro-secular CHP party’s base. An increasingly confident Ince has even begun courting voters in Erdogan’s backyard.

On Saturday, Ince took his campaign to Istanbul’s Uskudar district. Historically religiously conservative, Uskudar is where Erdogan chose to build his private residence overlooking the Bosphorus waterway that divides Istanbul.

Nearby, construction is the final stages on the massive $100 million Camlica mosque built by Erdogan supporters. The mosque has become a potent symbol of the president’s Islamist roots.

With Erdogan portraying himself as the protector of religious rights, Uskudar has traditionally been a stronghold for the president.

But Ince’s arrival in Uskudar was greeted by thousands of supporters, chanting “president Ince.”

“He is challenging Erdogan in front of his home,” said one enthusiastic supporter, adding “it is clearly seen here that Turkey needs Muharrem Ince. No one can stop him.”

A new page

Ince’s CHP party has always been viewed with deep suspicion by religious voters because it was created by the founder of the secular state, Mustafa Kemal Ataturk.

The CHP used to strongly back controls on religion, including the banning of Islamic headscarves in universities and courts. Restrictions ended by Erdogan in the face of bitter opposition by the CHP.

But Ince’s campaign is built on turning a page on Turkey’s bitter polarizations. Addressing the packed Uskudar crowd, he repeated a message of freedom and justice for all.

“When we embrace the 81 million, there will no longer be the…

MORE ARTICLES IN THIS CATEGORY